Safety

This race is an adventure and will test you to the limit, physically and psychologically, but we have made it as safe as possible.

China is a very safe country, much safer than practically anywhere in the West, and violent crime is extremely rare. Violent crime against foreign visitors is practically unheard of. It is no exaggeration to say that people in China are very friendly, generous towards and ready to help foreign visitors. If anything, they may be over eager to make friends with foreigners, and may insist on having photographs taken with you, especially in remote locations.

Unlike in many parts of the world, poor, remote locations in China are also extremely safe. There is NO risk of muggings, highway robbery or assault. The police and the security services are there to do their job and can be relied on by foreign visitors for help.

The race course is very difficult, but there is no risk from wild animals. Despite what you may hear, there are NO wolves, bears, wild dogs or any other large predators or dangerous animals on the course.

The course approaches human settlements on several occasions and villagers keep dogs. These may approach runners, follow them and bark (like village dogs around the world do), but no runner has ever been attacked. If approached by villagers’ dogs, remain confident, raise your walking pole and pretend (or not) to throw a rock in their direction. We can also give you anti-dog spray you need, but it has never been used by runners.

There are few poisonous invertebrates and snakes in this part of the Gobi. The race is relatively late in the year, the temperatures are lower, and so there are even fewer reptiles around. You are very unlikely to see snakes.

All runners are tracked live from our Command and Control center. We also have patrol vehicles out on the course monitoring runners and sweepers following the last competitors. Health and condition of each runner are monitored closely throughout the race by our medical team.